Xenophobic Violence in South Africa

By: Ifeoluwa Olawole As recently as February 2017, a group of anti-immigrant protesters in Pretoria, South Africa set out to protest the presence of immigrants from other parts of Africa like Nigeria, Somalia, and Zimbabwe. This protest led to the looting and ransacking of stores owned by immigrants. Between February 5 and 18, Nigerian buildings, … Continue reading Xenophobic Violence in South Africa

An “Alternative Fact:” Muslim Refugees Are Not a Threat to America

During his Presidential campaign, Donald Trump called for a “total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States.” Less than a month into his presidency, Mr. Trump attempted to uphold this promise by signing an executive order prohibiting immigrants and visa-holders from seven Muslim-majority countries from entering the United States for 120 days. This … Continue reading An “Alternative Fact:” Muslim Refugees Are Not a Threat to America

The Future of the Iran Nuclear Deal Under The Trump Administration

Since Implementation Day, January 16, 2016, the Iran Nuclear Deal has succeeded in its goal of preventing Iran from acquiring nuclear weapons-capabilities. However, in the past year, relations have not substantially improved between the U.S. and Iran and Iran has not seen the economic improvements it expected. The deal has also been tested by several … Continue reading The Future of the Iran Nuclear Deal Under The Trump Administration

What is Our Obligation? The Refugee Crisis and the U.S. Elections

This election cycle has been a whirlwind of high emotions and increased division in our country. As the rest of the world watches our presidential election in astonishment, we have admittedly been less concerned with the issues facing the rest of the international community, in particular, the refugee crisis. Starting in the Middle East, this … Continue reading What is Our Obligation? The Refugee Crisis and the U.S. Elections

May it Please the Court…but Mostly the Senate

  Justice Scalia’s recent passing has created a political hailstorm, bringing  the third branch of government into the heat of electoral primary politics. Earlier this month, President Obama announced via SCOTUS blog his intention to fulfill his responsibilities as the commander-in-chief and nominate a justice to the Court, saying that his nominee would have “a … Continue reading May it Please the Court…but Mostly the Senate

Private Prisons: Profiting from Families, Controlling Inmates’ Fates

  While we’ve heard plenty about Big Oil, the gun lobby, and Big Pharma throughout this 2016 Presidential race, few have been talking about another highly influential industry: private prisons. According to ProPublica, private prisons in the United States grew by 37% between 2002-2009. In total, there are now 130 private prisons with approximately 157,000 … Continue reading Private Prisons: Profiting from Families, Controlling Inmates’ Fates

How Policy Will Trip Up Outsiders Like Carson and Trump

Policy wonks often grumble about the negligible role policy plays in the election process. Events like debates and speeches do little to encourage candidates to talk in detail about their policy proposals or give voters the tools to judge which proposals are most effective. The 2016 Republican primary may signify the low point of policy’s … Continue reading How Policy Will Trip Up Outsiders Like Carson and Trump

Guest Worker Programs and the 2016 Election

Immigration has emerged as a major issue on both sides of the 2016 Presidential campaign. While Democrats’ sanctuary cities and Trump’s proposed wall along the border have dominated the immigration debate thus far, guest worker programs have also proven to be a key component of candidates’ immigration proposals on both sides of the aisle. Marco … Continue reading Guest Worker Programs and the 2016 Election